Champion Tip 9

 

 

 

The perfect swing, full turn and follow through.

 

 

Hip Speed Drill 1:

Sole Plant Hip Speed Drill 2:

Baseball Stride Hip Speed Drill 3:

Here we only have the text – with the course you will have DVD visual.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Heel Plant Here are a series of drills to help develop hip speed.

Purpose Develop hip speed. Swing Thought Hips. Short Description Sole Plant Drill The Sole Plant drill involves turning your belt buckle 90 degrees away from the ball at the top of the swing and allowing your left foot to roll up so your left toe is completely pointed at the ground and the sole of your left shoe is facing toward the target. There should be no weight on your left foot. Initiate the downswing by imagining a tee lying sideways on the ground that you are going to break in half with your left heel. Use the forceful left heel plant to create your fastest hip rotation so you finish your swing with your belt buckle completely facing the target and all of your weight on your left foot. This drill has considerably more hip rotation than you would expect in your normal swing. In fact, the drill is much like the Baseball Rip Swing that you learned in the balance section, except that in this case you will be hitting a ball. You should also not worry about your leverage position with this drill. Your primary focus will be on hip speed. Long Description Sole Plant Drill The concept behind the Sole Plant drill is to develop as much hip speed as possible by maximizing the amount of overall hip rotation back and forward. Your goal will be to turn your hips as far away from the ball on the backswing as possible, and then from that position, turn your hips to the target as fast as possible, while hitting the golf ball. Step 1: 90° Backswing Hip Rotation Take your normal stance and posture and address a ball. On your backswing turn your hips 90 degrees away from the ball so your belt buckle (which started facing the ball) is facing right, directly away from the target. In order to reach this backswing position you will need to allow your left leg to relax so your left shoe can roll all the way up and the toe can point to the ground without any weight on it. All of your weight should be on your right side. This part of the Sole Plant drill is very similar to the Baseball Rip drill in that the first few times you attempt to complete this backswing your hips and left foot will likely only get ½ to ¾ of the way back. It will probably take several practice swings before you can successfully make this 90 degree backswing as well as allow your left toe to point into the ground. Please pay attention during this process not just to getting to the right position, but also to what muscle groups you had to relax to achieve this exaggerated turn. When you get to this extreme backswing position your weight will be over the top of, or on the outside part of your right foot. Once again, you don’t need to worry about your leverage position with this drill. Simply concentrate on hip speed. Move your hips as much as possible. Step 2: Downswing Hip Speed Initiate the downswing by forcefully planting your left heel on the ground and allowing the force of the heel plant to pivot your hips toward the target. Your goal is to get your belt buckle facing the target as quickly as possible. You may try imagining a tee lying sideways on the ground under the outside portion of your left heel—about where your ankle is located. As you make your backswing and then start your downswing, try to break the tee in half with the outside edge of your left foot. In order to break the tee with the outside part of your left foot you will need to shift your weight to your left side. Placing the tee outside and back toward your ankle will help ensure you make a pivot as you accomplish this weight shift, rather than a hip slide. Step 3: Releasing the Club Tension Free during this swing you will be generating as much hip speed and club head speed as possible. It is less important where the ball goes, particularly when you first attempt this drill. Your emphasis during the swing should be on staying in balance and allowing the rotation of your hips and core to generate speed for the club head. Your grip pressure and arm tension should be minimal. On the 1 to 10 scale your grip pressure and tension should be 3 or lower—just enough to keep your hold on the club. Remember, you do not want tension in your hands and arms to slow down your swing. Think crack-the-whip to generate a mental picture of how your body should be swinging the club. You want your club and your arms to lag as far behind you as possible when you execute your downswing, so the torque of your core rotation whips the club through the impact zone. You should feel as though your body is flinging the club toward the target, with almost no pressure in the hands and arms other than what is required to square up the club head at impact. Step 4: Finish Your Swing Finish your swing with your hips completely facing the target and your right toe pointed into the ground with no weight on it. Your arms and shoulders will likely over-rotate, particularly if you maintain a tension-free swing. Select “Swing Arc” on the main menu of the accompanying DVD to view the Sole Plant drill. Or you can find the drill online at: http://www.targetcenteredgolf.com/videos/sole_plant.html Hip Speed Drill #2: Baseball Stride Drill Purpose Lower body lead. Leg- drive. Also helps with weight shift. Swing Thought Step, THEN Swing. Short Description Baseball Stride Drill The purpose of the Baseball Stride drill is to help you get the feel of starting your downswing with your lower body. Practicing the Baseball Stride Drill can also help with understanding proper timing. Take your normal stance and address with an iron, but move the ball up to your left foot (in the driver position). Leaving your club on the ground behind the ball, move your left foot back toward your right foot. With your feet close together complete your backswing. Pause slightly at the top, and then start your downswing by lifting your left foot and taking a baseball stride toward the target. Plant your left foot, shift your weight and make your rotation, then allow the club to swing down and hit the ball. You want to consciously hold your arms back as long as possible during this drill. Your swing thought should be “step, THEN swing” with the THEN serving as a reminder to keep your hands and arms back while your lower body completes the swing. Keep your grip pressure at 4 (on a scale of 10) or less on this drill. Long Description Baseball Stride Drill The Baseball Stride drill is designed to help you understand how the lower body should lead the way on the downswing. To practice this drill, imagine a baseball player at the plate. As the pitch comes in the batter shifts his weight back, then raises his left foot and steps into the pitch to make his swing. This drill makes use of the same weight transfer and sequencing of weight shift and hip turn. Step 1: Baseball Stride Drill—Feet Together Use an iron for this drill. Take your normal stance and address position with one exception. For this drill you will move the ball forward in your stance to your left foot, where you would normally position the ball for a driver shot. Leaving the club head on the ground behind the ball, move your left foot back toward your right foot so your feet are together. Your right foot does not move. You will have to reach forward to keep the club head behind the ball. Step 2: Baseball Stride Drill—Step, THEN Swing Take your normal backswing. At the top of your swing pause the club. Start your downswing by stepping forward. Plant your left foot to initiate both the weight shift and hip turn. You will complete most of your weight shift and hip turn before you allow your arms to swing down to the ball. Your goal with the baseball stride drill is to overemphasize the initiation of the downswing with the lower body. You want to hold your arms and hands back as long as possible, while your lower body nearly completes the weight shift and hip turn, so your forward momentum and body rotation make it impossible to keep the club back any longer. Step 3: Baseball Stride Drill—Release the Club To The Target When your weight shift and core rotation are nearly complete, allow the momentum generated by your rotation to swing the club through the impact area. That is why the swing thought is “step, THEN swing” with the emphasis on the pause caused by the “then” cadence. Keep your grip pressure relatively light during this drill—approximately 3 or 4 (on a scale of 10) so you can feel the club release toward the target. If you have a tendency to bring the club down early with your hands and arms, this drill will emphasize the importance of proper sequencing and timing. Many of my students challenged with this issue soon discover they are hitting the ball before their left foot has even touched the ground. When this happens the timing mismatch is easy for students to feel. Variation 1 Baseball Stride Drill—Gary Player Walk-Through If you have a challenge getting your lower body to lead the way on the downswing and if you have a challenge getting your weight shifted completely to your left side on the downswing, try this drill variation. Gary Player has been a golf icon for more than half a century. If you have seen him play in the last few years you will notice one of his swing quirks—he hits the ball and then walks a few steps toward the target. Gary is so committed to getting his weight to the left side and to getting every ounce of momentum possible through the ball that his weight shift literally causes him to keep walking once he hits. There may be some benefits for you in this drill variation. When you take your baseball stride drill, hit the ball and take a few steps toward the target. We call this the Gary Player walk-through. In order for you to take a step toward the target with your right foot after you hit, you must take all the weight off the right foot. You won’t be able to take a forward step if you still have weight on your right foot after impact. Since you are already making a step with your left foot to start the downswing, taking another step with your right foot after impact will be somewhat instinctual in that you won’t have to consciously make any adjustments to keep moving. If you keep your mental focus on walking forward after impact, your body will make the necessary weight shift to prepare you for your step. Select “Speed” on the main menu of the accompanying DVD to view the Baseball Stride drill. Or you can find the drill online at: http://www.targetcenteredgolf.com/videos/baseball_stride.html Hip Speed Drill #3: Heel Plant Drill Purpose Start the downswing with the lower body and develop hip speed as well as leg drive. Swing Thought Stomp! Short Description Heel Plant Drill The Heel Plant drill is designed to help you get the feel of starting the downswing with a left side heel plant, weight shift, and pivot. On your backswing allow your left heel to rise off the ground an inch or two. Imagine a tee lying sideways on the ground underneath your left heel, toward the outside portion of your shoe. Start your downswing by planting your left heel hard enough on the tee to break it in two. Allow the heel plant to pull the hips into a pivot, so your weight shift and pivot are happening as a result of your foot driving down. Your swing thought is “stomp” or break the tee. Keep your grip pressure under 4 (on a scale of 10) and allow the club to swing through the impact area as rapidly as possible.

Long Description Heel Plant Drill In his book “How I play Golf”

Tiger Woods notes that when he wants a little more distance he “snaps” his left knee straight on the downswing. That move allows him to clear his hips faster, which in turn speeds up the rotation of his shoulders and ultimately his arms and the club. The Heel Plant drill works in much the same manner, but with less risk to your knee (perhaps the “snap” is why Tiger has so much knee trouble. He should try this heel plant instead).

Step 1 Heel Plant Drill—Lift the Left Heel Take your normal address position with the driver. On your backswing allow your left heel to come off the ground a couple of inches during your rotation. Allowing your heel to come off the ground should facilitate more hip rotation on the backswing, giving you a better “wind up” as you store power for the downswing. The other benefit of allowing the left heel to rise is that it is much easier to keep your belt line level, which means you will be putting considerably less torque on your lower back. Step 2 Heel Plant Drill—Plant and Rotate Pause at the top of the backswing to “set” the club, and then start your downswing by driving your left heel into the ground. You don’t want to create any extra lateral motion with the hips, so when you plant the left heel use that momentum to facilitate your hip rotation at the same time. When you make your heel plant you want to focus on getting your weight on the outside part of your left foot in the area of your ankle. To emphasize the position of where your weight should come down you can lay a tee down on the ground underneath your left ankle on the outer part of the shoe. Then, try to break the tee in half when you plant your heel on the downswing. Students sometimes practice just the heel plant part a couple of times without swinging a club until they get a sense of how to drive their left leg forcefully into the ground. Because the tee is under the outside part of their shoe they have to get their weight all the way over to the outside part of their foot before they can create enough force to try to break the tee. If you plant your heel on the inside part of your left foot you won’t facilitate any kind of hip rotation. Once students get the idea of forcefully planting their left foot they work next to integrate hip rotation into that movement. The heel plant alone won’t generate club head speed at impact unless it is used to create hip rotation.

Step 3 Heel Plant Drill—Finish with A Handshake To paint a picture for my students I have them imagine a simple hand shake. I have them turn away in their backswing (without a club) with their heel off the ground. I take up a position about 3 feet to their left and THE 5 KEYS T O DISTANCE www.TargetCenteredGolf.com 98 down their target line. From their position at the top I have them simply turn toward me and reach out with their right hand to shake hands. This is a completely natural motion for most people, and they invariably do it in exactly the right sequence without having to focus on the mechanics. From their position at the top (turned away from me), they have one simple goal (swing thought) which is to shake hands. They let their body figure out how to get them to the right position. They plant their left heel first and simultaneously initiate a weight shift together with hip rotation. Because they know they will have to reach out for my hand (target extension), they naturally shift their weight to the outside part of their left foot, and they position their centre of mass straight over their ankle so they end up in a balanced position. Their right hand swings up and out in a natural movement. When you practice your Heel Plant drills keep these visual images of breaking the tee and shaking hands in mind. Variation 1 Heel Plant Drill: Right Knee Kick This is a variation on the Heel Plant drill that actually focuses on your right side to achieve the same hip turn and weight shift as the Heel Plant drill. It is in many respects similar to the Gary Player Walk- through, but in this case you won’t be taking any additional steps. As you make your downswing and continue your rotation through impact kick your right knee forcibly toward the target. When my wife took a self-defence class they taught her how to disable an attacker by delivering a sharp knee blow to the man’s groin area. (Fortunately she did not require that I practice this defensive move with her.) But the idea is the same: Kicking your right knee toward the target requires the two things you are practicing with these drills—a weight shift and a fast hip turn. Variation 2 Heel Plant Drill: Right Heel Fire the Right Heel Fire is very similar to the Right Knee Kick drill variation since it focuses on the right side to generate hip speed. I came up with drill while working with a student who had bad knees, and it has worked successfully for a number of other students as well. Because my student with the bad knees couldn’t effectively drive with his legs we had to come up with another way for him to generate hip speed without risking additional physical damage. The answer was to focus on firing the right heel on the downswing. The your shoelaces pointed at the target as quickly as possible on the downswing. Keeping this swing thought in mind will force you to get your weight off your right foot quickly. If you get your right heel in the air fast enough it will force your left side to rotate and get out of the way in a hurry. With both the Knee Kick drill and the Right Heel Fire drill you will want to keep your hands relatively light on the club, with a grip pressure of only 3 or 4 (on a scale of 10). You want to develop the feel of a fast hip turn whipping the club through the impact area, and you can only goal with this drill is to get your right heel up in the air with your shoelaces pointed at the target as quickly as possible on the downswing. Keeping this swing thought in mind will force you to get your weight off your right foot quickly. If you get your right heel in the air fast enough it will force your left side to rotate and get out of the way in a hurry. With both the Knee Kick drill and the Right Heel Fire drill you will want to keep your hands relatively light on the club, with a grip pressure of only 3 or 4 (on a scale of 10). You want to develop the feel of a fast hip turn whipping the club through the impact area, and you can only accomplish this with less hand and arm tension.

The amazing Five Keys to Distance

 

 

If you need any assistance please contact your coach Ascharapan Support@hightolow.co.uk

For all your golf tips, instruction, coaching, the Champions Tips  ALL FREE   Click here

Please send the link on to your friends and colleagues – on Face Book Twitter – all the social net works. they will be happy to receive the link to one of the best golf web page on the internet ( ALL FREE)   http://golfcoachblog.com

The First Major this week end: 

Winning the Masters takes a special kind of ability. It’s the first major of the year. The golf course gets tougher every year. The greens are so fast. Psychological pressure is enormous. Is Mickelson peaking at the right time for the Masters? Phil won the Shell Houston Open This weekend with a sparkling 20-under, for lots of Freebies – Books, lessons, coaching, click on the link.

The golf world is buzzing about Mickelson, and he now appears to be the frontrunner at Augusta, where he is the defending champion Mickelson’s game clicked on all cylinders over the last two days. He controlled his irons, holed chips shots in pressure situations and rolled in putts with authority. He ranked sixth in driving distance for the week and hit almost 78 percent of the greens

It was Mickelson’s 39th career PGA Tour victory and his first of the 2011 season. With the victory, he jumped to No. 3 in the world golf rankings and No. 2 on the FedEx Cup standings.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.